Pet-Friendly Houseplants

Do you love both pets and plants? If so, did you know that some houseplants can be very toxic if ingested? If you have cats or dogs in the house, it is definitely good to know which plants may pose a threat to your beloved furry friends, regardless of whether or not they tend to tamper with your plants.


Non-Toxic Houseplants That are Safe for Homes with Pets

Here is a list of houseplants that are non-toxic to cats and dogs. While this list is not comprehensive, these are a few suggestions that are common in the world of houseplants and make lovely additions to any home with pets! Click here for a full list of plants that are safe for your pets!


Echeveria

Echeveria are possibly one of the most common succulent houseplants there are! With tons of cute and colorful options, these compact and trendy plants are easy to care for and you won't have to worry about any adverse effects in the case that your pets do get into them.


How to Care for Echeveria

Light: Grows best in full sun. Will begin to get leggy without enough sun.

Water: Once every 2-3 weeks. Overwatering is the easiest way to kill succulent plants!

Soil: Cactus soil or another very well-draining soil mix.


Haworthia

These adorable and compact succulent plants have a lot of character! They are very low-maintenance and easy to care for. If your plant is really happy, it will even start to produce little pups that you can propagate into additional plants!


How to Care for Haworthia

Light: Grows best in full sun. Can tolerate lower light conditions.

Water: Once every 2-3 weeks. Lessen watering frequency with less light to avoid overwatering.

Soil: Cactus soil or another very well-draining soil mix.


Burros Tail (Sedum morganianum)

This succulent variety grows best in hanging baskets. Its adorable, compact leaves will grow as long as you allow them to! They are also very easy to propagate. Simply cut the stem wherever you would like, pop a couple of leaves off the cut piece, allow the cuts to callous over for a day, and then insert the cutting into a new pot and pack the soil around the base. Water sparingly for several weeks and the cut stem will begin to grow roots!


How to Care for Burro's Tail

Light: Grows best in full sun. Will begin to get leggy without enough sun.

Water: Once every 2-3 weeks. Overwatering is the easiest way to kill succulent plants!

Soil: Cactus soil or another very well-draining soil mix.

Cactus

While cacti are not poisonous if ingested, their main hazard is their spines! Often the prickly nature of most cacti is enough to deter your pet from making a snack of it, though in the case that they do, your pet's health will not be compromised.


How to Care for Cacti

Light: Grows best in full sun. Can tolerate lower light conditions.

Water: Once every 2-3 weeks. Overwatering is the easiest way to kill succulent plants! Lessen watering frequency with less light to avoid overwatering.

Soil: Cactus soil or another very well-draining soil mix.


Orchids

If you are looking for a flowering houseplant that is safe for your pets, orchids are one of the most beautiful! They come in countless shapes, sizes, colors, patterns, and more! Orchids do require specific care, but if you take the time to get to know them, they will grace your home with unmatched beauty!


How to Care for Orchids

Light: Lots of bright, indirect sunlight.

Water: Orchids do not like to dry out between waterings. Water 1-2 times per week.

Soil: Requires moist, well-draining soil. Plant in orchid bark or a similar medium.


Prayer Plants (Calathea)

Calathea are beautiful and ornate! They can be a bit finicky and really love the perfect levels of moisture and humidity, so if you are willing to baby your plants a little bit, this may be the perfect fit for you!


How to Care for Calathea

Light: Prefer medium, indirect sunlight but can tolerate lower light levels too.

Water: Water once per week or enough to keep the soil moist but not soggy. Do not let them dry out between waterings.

Soil: Amend potting soil with orchid bark and perlite to help it drain well while still retaining moisture.


African Violet (Saintpaulia)

These beautiful flowering houseplants will get along just fine with your pets. They don't like getting water on their leaves though, so watering them from the bottom is highly recommended! We have some lovely pots made specifically for African Violets at the Garden Center, so stop by and take a look!


How to Care for African Violets

Light: African violets require indirect sunlight. Direct sun will burn the leaves. East-facing windows are best.

Water: Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Water from below to avoid getting water on the leaves, as this will cause damage.

Soil: Choose an African Violet specific soil or plant in soil that is well-draining but also retains moisture.


Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

This type of palm tree is absolutely adorable, low-maintenance, and pet friendly! It grows a thick and stout trunk with fun and unique fronds that have a slight curl to them, making them look like curly hair tied back in a ponytail! These palms tolerate dry conditions well, and while they can survive in a variety of growing conditions, they will thrive in the conditions mentioned below!


How to Care for Ponytail Palms

Light: Bright, indirect light. Avoid full sun exposure!

Water: Water once every 3-4 weeks, or after the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry to the touch.

Soil: Requires well-draining soil. Plant in a cactus mix or amend potting soil with sand and perlite.


Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

Palm trees in general are fairly easy to care for. They do like higher humidity levels and may experience stunted growth in less than ideal environments. In addition to the Areca palms, Fan Palms, Majesty Palms (Ravenea rivularis), and Lady Finger Palms (Rhapis excelsa) are also pet-friendly and have similar care requirements.


How to Care for Palm Trees

Light: Bright, indirect light. Avoid full sun exposure!

Water: Keep the soil slightly moist in the spring and summer, allowing the top 1-2 inches to dry out between waterings.

Soil: Standard potting mix is usually fine for these plants. The goal is a well-draining potting mix that also retains some moisture.


Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

Parlor Palms are cute and compact, making them perfect for homes with limited space. They are one of the most popular palms for their easy care and friendly nature.


How to Care for Parlor Palms

Light: Thrives in medium to bright indirect light. Can tolerate low light conditions.

Water: Water once every two weeks, allowing the soil to dry out slightly between waterings.

Soil: Standard potting mix is usually fine for these plants. The goal is a well-draining potting mix that also retains some moisture.


Money Tree (Pachira aquatica)

These houseplants are popular for their woven trunks. They have a thick, woody base that can be manipulated during growth into braided patterns. These trees range in size greatly, being anywhere from tabletop size to large trees that stand five feet tall. Their unique foliage is also something that sets them apart from other houseplants!


How to Care for Money Trees

Light: Bright to medium indirect light for six hours per day is ideal.

Water: Once every two weeks, or when the soil has dried out slightly.

Soil: The soil should remain moist but not soggy. Plant in a well-draining potting mix.

Bromeliad

These tropical beauties are quite an eye-catcher. They come in a variety of beautiful colors and will make for a lovely addition to your pet-filled home! Bromeliads are also quite easy to care for, which is one more reason to add this plant to your collection!


How to Care for Bromeliads

Light: Bright, indirect light. Direct sun will scorch the leaves of this plant.

Water: Water once every two weeks, allowing the soil to dry out only slightly.

Soil: Plant in soil that holds moisture but drains well. A mixture of two-thirds peat-based soil and one-third sand is recommended.


Cast Iron Plant (Aspidistra elatior)

Cast Iron Plants are simple and easy to care for. Their foliage also comes with different patterns, from white speckles to variegated stripes, to solid, broad green leaves. These plants fill a corner nicely and bring simple but beautiful greenery to any home!


How to Care for Cast Iron Plants

Light: Can tolerate low light conditions. Keep out of the direct sun as this will burn the leaves.

Water: Let this plant dry out substantially between waterings. It would rather be too dry than too wet, and overwatering will cause root rot. Recommended 1-2 times per month.

Soil: Well-draining potting mix.


Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata)

If you are a fan of ferns, this might be the plant for you! They look amazing in hanging baskets with their full and lush appearance. They are sure to get along with your pets as well! They are easy to care for as far as ferns go, and as long as they stay adequately moist, you will have a happy plant!


How to Care for Boston Ferns

Light: Indirect medium light. Too much light will cause the plant's leaves to dry out and turn brown.

Water: Keep the soil lightly moist, but not soggy, at all times.

Soil: These ferns prefer a light, fast-draining soil. Amend potting soil with perlite.


Bird's Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus)

Bird's Nest Ferns are typically smaller ferns that grow broad, crinkly leaves of a light green color. They are lush and adorable, and are the perfect houseplant for a home with dogs, cats, or children!


How to Care for Bird's Nest Ferns

Light: Bright, indirect sun is ideal. They can tolerate direct exposure to the early morning sun, but otherwise, direct sunlight will burn the leaves.

Water: Water every 1-2 weeks, allowing the soil to dry out halfway between waterings.

Soil: Plant in well-draining soil that also maintains some moisture.


Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)

Spider plants are perhaps one of the most low-maintenance houseplants out there. They are able to handle low-light conditions, are not extremely particular when it comes to watering, grow well in almost any soil, and are safe you have around your curious kids and pets.


How to Care for Spider Plants

Light: Bright, indirect light is ideal, though they can tolerate low light as well. Avoid direct light as this can scorch the leaves.

Water: Watering once every 1-2 weeks is ideal, or whenever you notice the soil is dry.

Soil: Well-draining soil is ideal.


Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera)

Christmas Cactus get their name because they typically bloom around Christmas time! They are different from your normal cactus, preferring indirect light. Another interesting fact is that they need the perfect ratio of light and dark to encourage blooming (approximately 8 hours of light and 16 hours of darkness)! Their blooms come in all sorts of beautiful colors as well!


How to Care for Christmas Cactus

Light: Bright, indirect light.

Water: Water once every 2-3 weeks or after the top two inches of soil is dry.

Soil: A well-draining soil is essential! We recommend two-thirds potting mix and one-third perlite.


Peperomia

Peperomia are another type of houseplant that come in all sorts of different colors. From this deep red-ish purple peperomia to other silvery-blue varieties, these plants are quite exquisite! Their varying foliage is also one of the reasons this plant is so popular.


How to Care for Peperomia

Light: Medium to bright indirect light is best! They can tolerate direct morning sun or filtered direct light, but be careful not to expose them to too much sun or they could burn.

Water: Water once every 1-2 weeks, allowing the potting soil to dry out slightly between waterings.

Soil: Normal potting soil is sufficient, though we recommend a half perlite, half peat moss mix.


Nerve Plant (Fittonia albivenis)

These beautiful and delicate plants are known for their highly contrasted leaves. Nerve plants are generally grown as smaller houseplants, fitting nicely on a desk or shelf. They do prefer higher levels of humidity, so consider placing them near a humidifier or mist them daily!


How to Care for Nerve Plants

Light: Prefers bright, indirect light. Can tolerate low light.

Water: These plants like moist, well-draining soil. Water once every 1-2 weeks or when the soil has dried out slightly.

Soil: Plant in well-draining soil that also retains moisture well. We recommend amending the soil with peat moss.


Wax Plant (Hoya carnosa)

This lovely trailing plant has slightly woody stems and broad green leaves. When this plant is particularly happy, it will produce clumps of small, waxy-looking flowers. This plant has many different varieties, giving any plant lovers tons of options to choose from! These plants also like their roots to be constricted, so don't plant them in a pot that is too large! It is also recommended to keep a humidifier nearby as they will benefit from the extra moisture in the air.


How to Care for Hoyas

Light: Medium to bright indirect light. Too much direct sun will burn the leaves.

Water: Water every week or two once the soil has dried out slightly.

Soil: Hoyas require potting soil with good air circulation. We recommend mixing equal parts cactus mix, orchid mix, and perlite.


Chinese Money Plant (Pilea peperomioides)

These adorable l