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  • Writer's pictureKassi Kuppinger

Shop Herbs at Bath Garden Center

Herbs are a fantastic choice no matter what. They can be grown outdoors in your traditional garden, in container gardens, or indoors during the cold months. They take up little space and are easy to get creative with if you are experimenting with a small space garden. They are easy to grow, great for beginners, and very rewarding. Who doesn't love being able to walk out to the garden or front porch to harvest on-demand fresh herbs to use in any meal? At Bath Garden Center, we carry a wide variety of herbs throughout the spring, summer, and into the cold season. So, if you are looking for some herbs to fill your garden or occupy space on your window sills, stop by the Garden Center to see what we have in stock! Below is a list of herbs we carry, their uses, and how to grow them.


HERB DIRECTORY

 

Basil: Spicy Globe Basil, Thai Basil, Sweet Dolce Fresca Basil, Sweet Genovese Basil, Sweet Newton Basil | Catnip | German Chamomile | Chives | Cilantro (Coriander) | Coriander (Vietnamese Hot Mint) | Dill: Bouquet Dill, Dukat Dill, Fernleaf Dwarf Dill | Scented Geranium | Lavender: French Lavender, Hidcote Lavender, Munstead Lavender | Lemon Balm | Lemon Grass | Sweet Marjoram | Mint: Apple Mint, Chocolate Mint, Grapefruit Mint, Lemon Mint, Mojito Mint, Peppermint, Spanish Mint, Moroccan Mint, Spearmint, The Best Mint | Oregano: Oregano, Hot & Spicy Oregano | Parsley: Crispum Dark Leaf Parsley, Italian Giant Parsley | Rosemary: BBQ Rosemary, Officinalis Rosemary, Tuscan Blue Rosemary | Rue (Herb of Grace) | Sage: Garden Grey Sage, Golden Sage, Pineapple Sage, Tricolor Sage | Stevia | French Tarragon | Thyme: Common English Thyme, Lemon Thyme, Silver Posie Thyme, French Thyme

 

Spicy Globe Basil

Spicy Globe basil is a variety that stands out from the rest. As can be assumed by the name, its flavor is spicier than most other basil varieties, making it delicious in pasta dishes, pestos, and more! This plant is short and compact and maintains an attractive round shape similar to that of a globe. Regular harvesting will help promote more growth, and the flavor of this herb is most pungent when fresh! Spicy Globe basil generally stays between six and twelve inches tall and has oval, slightly toothed leaves that are more petite than varieties such as Dolce Fresca basil or Genovese basil. Grown as an annual herb, its strong scent and lovely white flowers make it a fun addition to flowerpots, container gardens, flower gardens, and more! You can even grow this herb indoors as a container herb throughout the winter months.


Planting & Growing Spicy Globe Basil

  • Light: Full sun. This variety grows best in full morning sun with some slight afternoon shade.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in fertile soil that drains freely. Consider mixing compost into your garden soil and be sure to use a high-quality potting mix when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Thai Basil

Thai basil is a variety that is native to Southeast Asia. Its flavor is stronger than that of sweet basil varieties, having hints of anise, licorice, and clove. Thai basil is best used fresh, as this is when the flavor is most pungent! Thai basil, while it is used in many different types of food, is also often used as an ornamental plant. It features purple stems and new growth emerges a deep purple, fading to a deep green color as it matures. The leaves of this plant are large, being 1-2 inches long. The plant itself can grow between twelve and eighteen inches tall, and if allowed to go to seed, produces pretty purple flowers. Be gentle with the leaves when harvesting as they bruise easily!


Planting & Growing Thai Basil

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Water at the base of the plant to avoid getting the foliage wet.

  • Soil: Plant in fertile soil that drains freely. Add compost to garden soil and use a premium potting mix when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Sweet Dolce Fresca Basil

Sweet Dolce Fresca Basil

This sweet and luscious variety of basil has broad green leaves with a full and compact shape thanks to short internodes. Its delicious flavor makes it a favorite in the kitchen! For a constant supply of basil throughout the entire season, pinch the tips of the plant regularly and do not allow it to flower. Once the plant begins to flower, all of its energy is diverted from leaf growth to flower and seed production. Pinching the plant back will also help the plant maintain a nice bushy form. When planted outdoors, Dolce Fresca basil can grow 2-3 feet tall. It can also be grown indoors or as a part of a container garden.


Planting & Growing Dolce Fresca Basil

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil. Mixing compost into garden soil is recommended. Use a quality potting soil when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted in a traditional garden or grown as a container herb.


 

Sweet Genovese Basil

Sweet Genovese Basil

Genovese basil is a variety that is very popular for its sweet and slightly spicy flavor. It grows large leaves that are great for use in a variety of dishes. This variety of basil is slow to bolt and will produce a constant supply of fresh herbs throughout the growing season as long as it is not allowed to go to seed. As soon as it begins to flower, pinch off the buds. This will keep the plant from diverting its energy toward flower and seed development and will encourage it to focus on foliage growth. Pinching the plant back will also help the plant maintain a nice bushy form. When planted outdoors, Genovese basil can grow 2-3 feet tall. It can also be grown indoors or as a part of a container garden.


Planting & Growing Genovese Basil

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. May require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil. Amend garden soil with compost and use a high-quality potting mix when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Sweet Newton Basil

Newton basil is a very popular type of basil. It features very large, bright green crinkled leaves and has a taste that is very similar to that of Genovese basil. Unlike Genovese basil, Newton basil does not have a licorice aftertaste, making it a popular choice among many. This fast-growing variety of basil grows approximately 16 inches tall and 12 inches wide, having an upright and bushy growth habit and leaves that can reach up to 4 inches long! It also exhibits a high resistance to Fusarium, which is a fungus that many garden plants are susceptible to. Due to its large leaves, Newton basil is delicious for use in vegetable wraps, salads, Caprese sandwiches and other tomato dishes, pestos, and more!


Planting & Growing Newton Basil

  • Light: Requires full sun exposure. Full sun will enhance the flavor of most herbs.

  • Water: Basil is not drought tolerant. Water regularly throughout the growing season and maintain slightly moist soil at all times to ensure a good crop.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is moderately rich in organic materials. Use compost to enrich the soil in your garden.

  • Planting: Grown as an annual in Colorado. Can also be grown indoors or outdoors as a container herb.


 

Catnip

Catnip

Catnip is a great multi-purpose herb to grow in your garden or around your home. It can be used for making tea which is very pleasant and has a lemon-mint flavor and fragrance. Along with fresh catnip planted in containers indoors year-round, catnip toys filled with dried leaves will provide your feline friends with hours of fun. But be warned; they may ignore you for a while! Catnip is very hardy and grows in almost any soil. It self-sows readily, so you will always have an abundance to share! Its pale green, soft leaves emit a characteristic, pungent, minty aroma when crushed. You'll find small white or lavender tubular flowers clustered at the ends of stems in early to midsummer with scattered blooming through early fall. To harvest catnip, cut stems about 4 inches from the ground. To dry harvested catnip, tie a bundle of stems together with string or rubber bands and hang them upside down in a brown paper bag. Store in a dry location until leaves crumble easily. Keep dried flowers and leaves and discard the stems. Store dried catnip in an airtight container in a cool, dry location until you find a use for them!


Planting & Growing Catnip

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Grows best in full sun and will tolerate partly shaded areas.

  • Water: Allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer. Prone to overwatering and root rot in containers, so be careful not overwater.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil. Consider amending garden soil with compost and use a premium potting mix when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

German Chamomile

German Chamomile

This adorable flowering herb is native to parts of England and is as pretty as it is useful. It features flowers with dainty white petals surrounding a yellow center, similar to that of a daisy. It is commonly used to promote relaxation, can be used to reduce swelling, and can alleviate common cold symptoms, indigestion, and anxiety, along with many other things. German chamomile, not to be confused with Roman chamomile, is grown as an annual and has a slight apple fragrance. Add fresh flowers to a salad, incorporate them into teas or cocktails, make chamomile cookies, use as fresh-cut flowers, and so much more! German chamomile can grow to be 24 inches tall and 12 inches wide in ideal environments. German chamomile self-seeds readily and may come back in subsequent years. German chamomile also grows great in containers!


Planting & Growing German Chamomile

  • Light: Full sun to part shade. Will grow quickest and flower best in full sun!

  • Water: Water consistently until established. German chamomile is somewhat drought-tolerant once it reaches maturity. Allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Chamomile plants will appreciate more moisture in very hot conditions.

  • Soil: Will grow best in soil that is rich in organic materials. Floppy stems may be a result of poor soil. Consider amending your soil with compost.

  • Planting: Can be planted outdoors in the garden or in containers. Also grows well in an indoor container garden.


 

Chives

Chives

Chives are an easy-to-grow herbaceous perennial that nearly resembles a clump of tall grass. Chives are a part of the same family as onions and garlic, and thus have an onion-like flavor that is mild and delicious. Use them in salads, fish dishes, eggs, soups, or on potatoes, in herb butter, or in a chive cream cheese. The options are endless! This herb's flowers are also edible, making for the perfect garnish as well as a beautiful bouquet. Chives are a great addition to your garden, attracting beneficial insects such as bees and repelling other unwanted insects such as Japanese beetles. Chives are slightly cold-tolerant and will come back year after year. Due to their clumping growth habit, these herbs can be divided every few years to help encourage healthy growth.


Planting & Growing Chives

  • Light: Chives grow best in full sun, though they will tolerate light shade. Flower production will decrease in shaded areas.

  • Water: Somewhat drought tolerant once established, though they do prefer consistently moist soil. Consider mulching the base of plants in extremely hot conditions.

  • Soil: Soil should be fertile and well-draining. Chives can be susceptible to root rot if planted in clay-heavy soils. Consider amending your soil if need be!

  • Planting: Chives grow great in the garden and as a container herb, either indoors or outdoors!


 

Cilantro (Coriander)

Cilantro (Coriander)

Cilantro refers to the leafy parts of the coriander plant, while coriander typically refers to the seeds that can be used as a spice. Being closely related to parsley, cilantro has a similar, though slightly stronger flavor with tangy citrus notes. It is commonly eaten as a garnish or used as a spice, and also has medicinal uses. Grows approximately 12-24 inches tall. The flavor of the leaves is best before the leaves turn feathery and plants begin to flower. If you are growing this plant for the coriander seeds, they should be harvested after they begin to turn brown and when the outer coat cracks, but before they drop off the plant and scatter. When the seeds are ready to harvest, cut the plant at the base of the stem and place the stems in a brown paper bag. As the seeds dry out, they will collect in the bottom of the bag and the stems can be discarded. Cilantro can be grown outdoors in a traditional garden, in a container garden, or indoors in containers!

Planting & Growing Cilantro

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Full sun is recommended but cilantro plants can tolerate partial shade.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil. Use compost in traditional gardens and periodically fertilize container gardens.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Coriander (Vietnamese Hot Mint)

This herb, commonly referred to as Vietnamese coriander or Vietnamese mint, is a fantastic substitute for mint or cilantro in a wide variety of dishes. It tastes similar to cilantro while being slightly more peppery, spicy, and lemony. It is recommended to harvest young leaves for use, as older leaves get tough and lose their flavor. Vietnamese Hot Mint loves hot environments and will grow well in a container.

Planting & Growing Coriander

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil. Native Colorado soil may need to be amended before planting. Use a high-quality potting soil for success with container gardening.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Bouquet Dill

Bouquet Dill

Bouquet Dill is an excellent pickling spice, particularly because of its early and abundant seed production. The foliage of this type of dill is also delicious sprinkled on potatoes, salmon, spinach, cucumbers, tomatoes, and lamb chops. It is very aromatic and is also an important host plant for caterpillars of swallowtail butterflies. In addition to this, dill provides a great beneficial-insect habitat in any garden. Bouquet dill can be harvested at any time up until the plant flowers. After it begins to flower, all of the plant's energy will go to flower and seed production and foliage production will begin to slow. Cut the leaves as close to the stem as possible when harvesting. Seeds should be harvested 2 to 3 weeks after flowering begins after the flower heads have turned brown. Dill is grown as an annual herb, though it reseeds itself very well and can often be seen growing spontaneously in subsequent years.


Planting & Growing Bouquet Dill

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day and enjoys some afternoon shade during the heat of the summer.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Allow soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Will require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil that has been amended with compost. Use a high-quality soil when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Dukat Dill

(Anethum graveolens 'Dukat')

Dukat Dill

This variety of dill is sweet and mellow in flavor and is often used in Scandinavian dishes. Its fresh and aromatic leaves are fantastic on steamed summer vegetables, in salads, dressings, and sauces, and perhaps most deliciously used to season salmon or other fish dishes. Dukat Leafy dill features decorative yellow flowers that attract and benefit certain pollinators such as bees and swallowtail butterflies. Dill is an important host plant for a variety of other beneficial insects such as caterpillars, ladybugs, and more. If you let some of your plants bloom, the pollinators in your garden will appreciate it and you can then harvest the pungent seed heads that are produced for use in seasoning pickles and other canned vegetables. Dukat dill is also slow to bolt, producing a bounty of fresh herbs for you to enjoy. Dill is grown as an annual in colder climates, though it will reseed itself if allowed to go to seed. Due to this, it is not uncommon to see volunteer plants popping up in your garden the following season. Dill can be grown in containers, can tolerate cooler temperatures, and will produce throughout the growing season if not allowed to go to seed. It will also grow a deep taproot which makes this herb quite drought-tolerant. Providing some support or shelter from wind may be necessary as these plants are tall and skinny, reaching heights of 12-24 inches.

Planting & Growing Dukat Dill

  • Light: Requires a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight per day. A warm and sunny spot is best for optimal production. Light afternoon shade in the summer is preferable.

  • Water: Drought tolerant, though soil should be kept moist for optimal productivity.

  • Soil: Dill will grow best in fertile soil. Amend garden soil with compost for increased nutrients and moisture retention.

  • Planting: Can be planted in a traditional garden or grown as a container herb.


 

Fernleaf Dwarf Dill

(Anethum graveolens 'Fernleaf')

Fernleaf Dwarf Dill

An All-American Selections winner, Fernleaf Dwarf dill features dark blue-green leaves that serve ornamental and culinary purposes! This dwarf variety of the popular dill herb is much more compact than most other varieties, growing approximately 12 inches tall and wide. Its compact size makes it ideal for container gardens and patio planters, and it will not require staking or other support due to its compact growth. Its fern-like leaves are very attractive and abundant with foliage that lasts throughout the season. The flowers, leaves, and seeds of this herb are commonly used in a wide variety of dishes including spring mix salads, fruit salads, fish, poultry, and more! The seeds of this herb can even be harvested and used for pickling a variety of different vegetables. Fernleaf Dwarf dill is grown as an annual, though it is not uncommon to see volunteer plants popping up in subsequent years due to the plant reseeding itself. In addition to its culinary uses, this type of dill is often used for ornamental purposes, adding an attractive feathery accent to flowerpots or bouquets.


Planting & Growing Fernleaf Dwarf Dill

  • Light: Plant dill in direct sun for best results. Dill will tolerate some afternoon shade in the summer.

  • Water: Grows best in soil that is moist but not soggy. Water when the top inch of soil becomes dry. May require daily watering during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, fertile soil that drains well. Soil pH between 5.5 and 6.5 is best. Consider mixing compost into the soil prior to planting and fertilizing throughout the growing season.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside in a traditional garden, grown in a container garden, or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

Scented Geranium

(Pelargonium graveolens)

Scented Geranium

Scented Geranium, or garden geranium, is a cousin of "common" geraniums. They are less showy and do not produce as many flowers as the geraniums people are most acquainted with, however, scented geranium does have a lovely fragrance as well as several culinary uses. They are often planted along walkways or entrances, clustered together to provide a low-maintenance arrangement of color and aroma. Scented geraniums grow well in containers or individual pots and their stems, leaves, and petals can be dried for potpourri. Scented geraniums have edible flowers that can be used in a variety of dishes and their scented leaves can be infused with sugar and jellies. Scented geraniums can take on all sorts of different fragrances from rose, to peppermint, to almond, lemon, chocolate, and more, which come from the oils present in their leaves.


Planting & Growing Scented Geranium

  • Light: Plant in full sun. Scented geraniums need at least 6 hours of sunlight. They can tolerate part shade, though this can result in leggy plants.

  • Water: Scented geraniums are drought tolerant and don't like sitting in wet soil. Water when the top inch of soil has dried out. Do not allow containers to dry out completely as this will cause leaves to turn yellow and drop.

  • Soil: Plant in fertile, well-draining soil. Soil that is too rich in organic materials can lessen the strength of the fragrance of these plants. Slightly acidic soil is ideal (pH 5.8-6.3).

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb.


 

French Lavender

(Lavandula stoechas)

French Lavender

This herb is wonderfully fragrant and bears abundant violet-blue flowers surrounded by silver-green foliage. French lavender, sometimes also called Spanish lavender, is not commonly used in cooking, though the flowers are edible and can be used in baking, desserts, with fresh fruit, or in teas. It has also been used for a variety of medicinal purposes. Lavender plants thrive in hot and arid environments as they love full sun exposure and are very drought tolerant once they are established. Keep in mind though that flowering will be more abundant if the soil is kept just slightly moist. Lavender is also a great option for Colorado planting as it can thrive in soil that is not extremely fertile. Simply ensure the plant has good drainage and it will grow and thrive! Most types of lavender are hardy in zones 5-9, however, French lavender is slightly more sensitive to freezing temperatures and is only considered to be hardy in zones 7-9. Due to this, it is common to see French lavender grown indoors or as a part of a container garden.

Planting & Growing French Lavender

  • Light: Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Full sun exposure is ideal.

  • Water: Very drought tolerant once established. Keeping the soil slightly moist will encourage better flowering. If planted in a container, never allow the soil to dry out completely. This plant is sensitive to overwatering.

  • Soil: Grows best in well-draining, chalky, or sandy soil conditions. Clay-heavy soils that retain excess water are not recommended.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Make sure your pot has a hole for drainage before potting. Bring container herbs indoors during the cold winter months.


 

Hidcote Lavender

(Lavandula angustifolia 'Hidcote')

Hidcote Lavender

This type of lavender is often used in perfumes, potpourri, as a seasoning, or as part of fresh or dried flower bouquets. It is a lovely and very versatile plant that is also often grown in gardens for its aesthetic alone. Hidcote lavender has compact growth and long-lasting purple flowers that rise above the silver-grey foliage. Lavender is great for attracting pollinators such as bees and butterflies, and it is resistant to rabbits and deer. It is very a drought-tolerant perennial once established and loves hot climates. At maturity, Hidcote lavender can reach approximately 18 inches tall and 24 inches wide. It is a popular ground cover plant, is quite ornamental, can be grown in containers, and is known for its variety of culinary, cosmetic, and medicinal uses. Being hardy in zones 5-8, lavender is the perfect herbaceous perennial for arid environments such as Colorado.

Planting & Growing Hidcote Lavender

  • Light: Plant in full sun. Requires at least 6 hours of sunlight per day for best results.

  • Water: Very drought tolerant once established. Does not tolerate consistently wet or saturated soils. Keep container plants slightly moist for improved flowering.

  • Soil: Grows best in well-draining, chalky, or sandy soil conditions. Will not grow well in clay-heavy soils.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown as a container herb. Ensure containers have proper drainage to help avoid issues related to overwatering. Bring pots indoors during the winter.


 

Munstead Lavender

(Lavandula angustifolia 'Munstead')

Munstead Lavender

Munstead lavender is a popular cultivar of English lavender and likely the most widely-grown lavender species. It is often referred to as True Lavender or Common Lavender due to its popularity. Mustead lavender has extremely fragrant, long-lasting purple flowers that are most often used in dried flower arrangements and potpourris. This plant blooms twice, once in late spring and again in early summer. It has a compact and bushy growth habit, reaching approximately 24 inches tall and 36 inches wide. The versatility of this plant allows for it to be used as a perennial border, groundcover, ornamental shrub, and in herb gardens. Munstead lavender can even be planted and grown in containers. It is drought tolerant once established, grows well in rocky or sandy soil, is hardy in zones 5-9, requires little maintenance, attracts butterflies and other pollinators, is deer and rabbit resistant, and is a great herbaceous perennial for any Colorado garden, landscape, or flowerbed.

Planting & Growing Munstead Lavender

  • Light: Plant in full sun exposure. Requires a minimum of 6 hours of sunlight per day.

  • Water: Very drought tolerant once established. Is very sensitive to overwatering and does not handle saturated soil well at all. Container plants will need more frequent watering and should not be allowed to dry out completely, though underwatering is better than overwatering.

  • Soil: Grows best in well-draining, chalky, or sandy soil conditions. Will not grow well in clay-heavy soils that are dense and hold onto excess moisture.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown as a container herb. Ensure any plants planted in containers have proper drainage to avoid overwatering. Bring containers indoors for the winter.


 

Lemon Balm

(Melissa officinalis)


Lemon balm is actually a member of the mint family and is a highly useful herb. It has culinary, medicinal, and cosmetic uses and has been known to help heal wounds, treat insect bites, promote relaxation, treat insomnia, soothe upset stomachs, and more! The leaves of this plant are yellow-green in color and look very similar to the leaves of mint plants. They have a lemony aroma and flavor and produce small clusters of light yellow flowers in the spring and summer. This herb grows equally well in the garden and in containers. The uses for this herb are seemingly endless, and it is also fantastic for attracting bees and other pollinators to your garden. Use the leaves to flavor meals, make tea, as a garnish, and more. This herb is a perennial and is hardy in zones 4-9.

Planting & Growing Lemon Balm

  • Light: Lemon balm prefers full sun, though plants can tolerate mild shade.

  • Water: Keep the soil consistently moist, but be careful not to overwater. The soil should never be allowed to dry out entirely between waterings, especially if plants are grown in pots. Soggy, over-saturated soil can be just as dangerous as soil that is completely dry.

  • Soil: Grows best in fertile, well-draining soil. Consider mixing compost into your soil to increase nutrient availability and moisture retention.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Be sure to only plant in containers that have a drainage hole to avoid overwatering.


 

Lemon Grass

(Cymbopogon citratus)

Lemon Grass

Lemongrass, a popular herb traditionally used in Asian foods, has a bright citrus aroma with hints of rose and ginger. This herb has a variety of medicinal uses in addition to its culinary uses. It is often used in herbal teas and is known to relieve pain and swelling, can help reduce fevers, and has many antioxidant properties. Lemongrass is a tropical herb, being hardy to zones 9-10. For this reason, lemongrass is grown as an annual herb in colder climates. Lemongrass also grows wonderfully in containers, which allows for the plant to be placed outdoors during the growing season and then brought indoors when the weather turns cold. Lemongrass can be used fresh or can be dried for later use. Harvest the stalks of the plant when they reach 12 inches tall and are 1/2 inch wide at the base. Due to its tropical nature, lemongrass prefers to grow in rich soil that is kept consistently moist. It thrives in full sun conditions and will benefit from regular fertilization with water-soluble plant food.

Planting & Growing Lemon Grass

  • Light: Lemongrass loves the heat, so plant in full sun for best results.

  • Water: Provide lemongrass with consistent moisture, watering when the top inch of soil becomes dry to the touch. Do not allow herbs planted in the ground or in containers to dry out completely.

  • Soil: Plant in fertile, well-draining soil. Consider mixing compost into your soil to improve drainage, moisture retention, and nutrient availability. Soil pH of 6.5-7 is preferable.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown as a container herb. Space plants 24 inches apart in the garden or plant single plants in containers at least 12 inches wide.


 

Sweet Marjoram

(Origanum majorana)

This herb is related to and has a similar flavor to oregano, but with a slightly more sweet taste. It is very useful in a variety of herb blends and marinades and is a popular ingredient in German sausage and herb bread. It also adds a nice mellow flavor to a variety of vegetables and is tasty in salads, herb butter, and vinaigrettes. Sweet marjoram is a slow-growing plant with thin grey-green leaves. It will grow approximately 12 inches tall and is grown as a summer annual in Colorado. Trim off flower buds when they appear to ensure continued growth. Once this plant flowers, it diverts all energy away from foliage growth and towards flower and seed production. Sweet marjoram is an excellent container herb and can be grown outdoors in the summer and then moved indoors throughout the winter.

Planting & Growing Sweet Marjoram

  • Light: Plant in full sun for best results.

  • Water: Sweet marjoram likes a slightly dry climate, so be careful not to overwater. Water when the top inch or two of soil is dry to the touch. Do not allow container plants to dry out completely.

  • Soil: Grows best in rich, well-draining soil. Consider mixing compost in with your soil and fertilize periodically throughout the growing season. A soil pH of 6.7-7.0 is ideal.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Double check the pot has a hole for drainage before potting.


 

Apple Mint

(Mentha suaveolens)

Apple Mint

This variety of mint features slightly rounded green leaves that have a fruity flavor and aroma. Its stems and leaves are covered in what looks like little hairs, giving them a fuzzy appearance. Due to this, apple mint is sometimes also referred to as 'fuzzy mint' or 'wooly mint.' This type of mint is a favorite in the kitchen and is most often used as a garnish, in fresh salads, or in teas and other beverages. Apple mint also has a number of medicinal and decorative uses. It produces white or light pink flowers beginning in late summer or early fall and can make a lovely addition to flower pots for this reason! Like all mint varieties, it grows and multiplies rapidly, so growing in a container is recommended to keep this herb from taking over the rest of your garden. Another interesting thing to know about apple mint is that growing it alongside cabbage, peas, tomatoes, and broccoli can improve its flavor! This herbaceous perennial is hardy in hardiness zones 5-9 and can be expected to return year after year when grown in a traditional garden. If grown in a container, be sure to bring your pots indoors or bury them for the winter to help insulate the roots, otherwise, the plant may die off entirely.


Planting & Growing Apple Mint

  • Light: Requires approximately 6 hours of sunlight per day. Mint grows best in full sun to partial shade.

  • Water: Water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Mint prefers evenly moist soil, though it will not respond well to soaked or soggy soil. Thorough and infrequent watering is better than frequent, shallow watering. Watering frequency may need to be increased during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Can adapt to a variety of soils, but grows best in fertile and well-draining soils. Consider mixing compost with your soil to help maintain consistent moisture.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Double check the pot has a hole for drainage before potting to help avoid overwatering and root rot.


 

Chocolate Mint

(Mentha × piperita f. citrata ‘Chocolate’)

Chocolate Mint

Chocolate mint is a close relative to the peppermint plant and has a mentholated coolness to it. It has an aroma that resembles chocolate, though it has an orange citrus flavor that is fantastic for use in drinks like tea or mojitos, sweet desserts, and even salads and savory dishes. While this plant is sterile and produces no seeds, it spreads vigorously via rhizomes, making it an attractive ground cover plant. It is not uncommon to see mint grown in containers to limit its spreading tendencies. Chocolate mint also produces lavender-purple flowers in the summer that are a lovely addition to decorative flowerpots and garden beds alike. Chocolate mint is hardy to USDA Hardiness Zones 5-9 and grows approximately 1-2 feet tall and wide. When grown in containers, it is important to never let the soil dry out completely as your mint plant will not react well to this. They also can be sensitive to overwatering, so be sure not to let the roots of your plant sit in soggy soil. Having a pot or container with good drainage is the best way to avoid oversaturated soil.


Planting & Growing Chocolate Mint

  • Light: Can be grown in full sun to partial shade. Mint is one of the few herbs that tend to prefer partial shade. Can be grown in full sun if adequate moisture is provided.

  • Water: Prefers soil that is slightly moist. If grown in containers, do not allow the soil to dry out completely. Ensure your container has good drainage to avoid issues with overwatering.

  • Soil: Grows best in moist and fertile soil that is either slightly acidic or neutral (6.5-7 pH). Mixing compost into the soil before planting is recommended.

  • Planting: Mint makes for an excellent groundcover plant. Chocolate mint spreads slightly slower than other mint varieties. Plant mint in containers to control spreading.


 

Grapefruit Mint

(Mentha x piperita ‘Grapefruit’)


Grapefruit mint, as you might expect, has a slight citrus aroma and flavor that is delicious in fruit salads, iced teas, and desserts. It can even act as the secret ingredient in a variety of chicken and fish dishes. Grow this herb for culinary purposes or as decoration in flower gardens or annual flower containers. In late summer to early fall, grapefruit mint produces beautiful lavender-colored flowers that are highly attractive to bees, butterflies, birds, and more! Mint grows rather quickly and is often recommended to grow in a container to keep it from taking over. Mint is a perfect herb for beginners and experts alike due to how easy it is to grow and care for and due to its wide number of uses. Like most mint varieties, grapefruit mint is a perennial plant and is hardy in zones 6-11.


Planting & Growing Grapefruit Mint

  • Light: Plant in full sun for best results. Mint can tolerate a small amount of shade in the afternoon, though its growth may be slowed.

  • Water: Water on a regular basis especially during the heat of the summer. Soil should stay slightly moist and container plants should not be allowed to dry out entirely. Be careful to avoid overwatering and do not allow the soil to stay saturated/soggy.

  • Soil: Can adapt to a variety of soils, but grows best in fertile and well-draining soils. Consider mixing compost with your soil to help maintain proper moisture and nutrients.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Make sure container herbs have a hole for drainage to avoid overwatering.


 

Lemon Mint

(Monarda citriodora)


Lemon mint goes by many names. Some of these include Lemon Bee Balm, Purple Lemon Mint, Horsemint, Lemon Horsemint, Purple Horsemint, and a variety of other names. Regardless of where all these various names come from, lemon mint is part of the mind family and is native to the southern United States and northern Mexico. This variety of mint is lemon-scented and features very decorative purple-blue flowers. Its slight lemon flavor makes it perfect for use by bakers, chefs, and mixologists alike in a variety of dishes including jams and jellies, lamb roasts, fruit, salads, cocktails, pastries, and a variety of other things. Lemon mint/lemon balm is often mistaken for more common mint plants, however, its oversized leaves, decorative flowers, and lemony scent often give this plant away. This plant is also quite effective at repelling unwanted pests and attracting pollinators and other beneficial insects. Lemon mint is quite hardy and is grown as a herbaceous perennial in zones 2-11. Once they reach maturity, plants can measure as tall as 30 inches and as wide as 12 inches, approximately. Lemon balm is very versatile and can easily be grown for ornamental purposes, in traditional gardens, and in container gardens.


Planting & Growing Lemon Mint (Lemon Balm)

  • Light: Lemon mint will grow best in full sun to partial shade. Lack of sunlight will result in slowed growth.

  • Water: Water regularly throughout the summer. Soil should stay slightly moist and should never be allowed to dry out completely, especially if growing in containers. Too much water can cause issues, so be careful not to overwater. Daily watering may be necessary during the heat of the summer.

  • Soil: Well-draining soil that is high in organic materials is ideal. This will aid in moisture retention. Consider mixing compost into your soil before planting. Always use containers with drainage holes to avoid issues with overwatering.

  • Planting: Can be grown in a traditional garden, container garden, as well as indoors during the winter.


 

Mojito Mint

(Mentha x villosa)

Mojito Mint

Mojito mint, as can be assumed by the name, has been deemed the best type of mint for use in mojitos! It has a slightly more intense flavor than many mint varieties, though its flavor is much milder than spearmint and contains hints of citrus. Mojito mint is ideal for a variety of cocktails due to the plant's large leaves that are perfect for muddling. It is also a fantastic ingredient in marinades for chicken or pork, is often used in fresh salads, is a delicious addition to desserts, and can be used in salves, along with many other things. Mint grows rather quickly and can easily take over an area if not confined. For this reason, it is often recommended to grow mint as a container herb. While mojito mint is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-10, any plants grown in containers should be brought indoors throughout the winter months to avoid freeze damage. The roots of container herbs are less insulated than the roots of herbs planted in in-ground gardens and they may not survive the winter if left out in freezing temperatures. Mint is a great herb for beginners as it thrives in a variety of different conditions and requires little maintenance.


Planting & Growing Mojito Mint

  • Light: Thrives in full sun to part shade. Can tolerate some afternoon shade in the heat of the summer, but too much shade will result in slowed growth.

  • Water: Water regularly and don't allow the soil to dry out completely, especially if your herbs are planted in containers. Make sure your plant has proper drainage and does not sit in soggy or over-saturated soils as this can also have negative effects.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, well-draining soil. Mix compost into your soil before planting to help improve moisture retention, drainage, and nutrient availability.

  • Planting: Can be planted outside or grown indoors as a container herb. Bring container herbs indoors for the winter. Ensure the pot has a hole for drainage before potting.


 

Peppermint Mint

(Mentha x piperita)

Peppermint Mint

The peppermint plant is best known for its use in peppermint tea, though the versatility of peppermint is exceptional and it is known to be used in a wide variety of things and for a wide variety of purposes. It is easy to grow and requires little maintenance, making it the perfect herb for beginners and seasoned gardeners alike. Peppermint produces cute pink flowers in the summer and can grow to a mature size of 1-2 feet tall and wide. This herbaceous perennial is hardy in zones 5-9 and is widely adaptable to a number of different growing conditions. As with all mint varieties, peppermint grows quite vigorously and can get out of control quickly, so growing mint in a container is recommended. If you do choose to grow peppermint in a container, be sure to bring it indoors throughout the winter. While it is hardy and perennial, the roots of container plants are not insulated as they are when they are planted in the ground. Due to this, their roots will easily freeze and cause the plant to die. Mint is also very easy to propagate, so if you do not want to bring a pot indoors, take some cuttings and start a new plant. This creates a fun way to grow herbs indoors during the winter season.


Planting & Growing Peppermint

  • Light: Grow peppermint in full sun to partial shade. Peppermint plants can tolerate dappled shade better than most culinary herbs.

  • Water: Maintain consistently moist soil for the most flavorful mint. Be careful not to overwater, as mint will not tolerate soaked or over-saturated soil.

  • Soil: Mint is highly adaptable to a number of soil conditions, though ideal soil is rich in organic materials. Consider mixing compost into the soil before planting for increased moisture retention, drainage, and nutrient availability.

  • Planting: Grows well in traditional gardens and container gardens alike. Bring container plants indoors for the winter and ensure all containers have a drainage hole before potting.


 

Spanish Mint

(Mentha spicata 'Spanish')


This variety of mint is highly aromatic and is great for attracting bees and butterflies to your garden. Its strong spearmint-flavored leaves are commonly used in teas, lemonades, soups, stir-fries, salads, and more! Spanish mint is a perennial plant and is hardy in zones 4-7. Mint plants make a wonderful addition to herb gardens, flower beds, flower pots, decorative borders, groundcover plants, and container gardens alike. Spanish mint, similar to many other mint varieties, is a vigorous grower and can easily take over an area. Depending on your reason for growing mint, it may be preferable to grow in a container so that the rapid spreading tendency of the plant is controlled and contained. Spanish mint produces petite blooms in the summer that can be pink, purple, or white in color. At maturity, the plant can reach up to 24 inches tall.


Planting & Growing Spanish Mint

  • Light: Plant in full sun for best results. Will tolerate partial shade.

  • Water: Mint grows best in soil that remains slightly moist. Soil should never be allowed to dry out completely, especially when planting in containers. Ensure your plants have good drainage to avoid issues with overwatering.

  • Soil: Mint can grow in just about any soil, though for the best-tasting, healthiest plants, rich, well-draining soil is best. Use premium potting mix when planting in containers and consider mixing compost into your soil before planting for improved moisture retention, drainage, and nutrient availability.

  • Planting: Grow mint in container gardens to control the spread of this herb. Spreads rapidly when not contained. Bring containers indoors during the winter.


 

Moroccan Mint

(Mentha spicata var. crispa 'Moroccan')


This easy-to-grow hardy perennial features lilac-purple flowers and a delicious and fresh minty flavor that is perfect for teas, cocktails, sauces, meats, salads, and any other dish that could benefit from its bright and fresh flavors. Mint tends to grow out of control quickly if not closely monitored. Growing mint in a container is recommended as an easy way to contain your plants and keep them from taking over your garden. Moroccan mint is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 5-11. When planted in the ground in cold climates, mint will die back entirely and will regrow from the roots of the plant come next spring. Mint planted in containers should be brought indoors for the winter to avoid their roots freezing and dying. Another benefit of mint is its natural ability to attract beneficial pollinators while repelling unwanted pests such as aphids.


Planting & Growing Spicata Moroccan Mint

  • Light: Mint grows best in full sun and can tolerate part shade. Grow in a south or west-facing window if growing indoors.

  • Water: Mint will grow best in soil that is kept slightly moist. Over-saturated soils can drown the roots of the plant, and overly dry roots will cause damage as well. Water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is rich and well-draining. Mixing compost with your soil before planting will help improve moisture retention and drainage and will also provide nutrients.

  • Planting: Mint can be grown indoors. Place in an area with bright light or provide supplemental light via a grow light. Ensure containers have drainage holes before planting.


 

Spearmint Mint

(Mentha spicata)

Spearmint Mint

Spearmint is perhaps the most flavorful and aromatic of all mint plants. It is valued for its wide variety of uses in cooking, medicine, and cosmetics. Spearmint plants look very similar to peppermint plants, having broad, glossy, bright green leaves that are hairless and slightly pointed at the tips. Spearmint produces lavender-colored flowers during the summer and mature plants can reach up to 2 feet tall and wide. Spearmint is a great herb for beginners due to its low maintenance and rapid growth. Growing mint in containers is always recommended to help control their rapid growth and keep them from taking over an area. Spearmint is an herbaceous perennial and is hardy in zones 4-10, though plants grown in containers should be brought indoors during the winter as containers will not provide the insulation needed to protect their roots throughout the cold months. Use spearmint fresh with vegetables and salads, incorporate it into sauces and other cooked meals, or use it in teas, cocktails, and other beverages.

Planting & Growing Spicata Spearmint

  • Light: Grow spearmint in full sun to part shade.

  • Water: Water regularly and keep the soil consistently moist. May require daily watering during the heat of the summer. Will not tolerate soaked or soggy soils. Water when the top inch of soil is dry.

  • Soil: Plant in rich soil that is well draining. Mix compost into the soil before planting to improve drainage and moisture retention. Compost will also add nutrients to the soil and improve growth.

  • Planting: Spearmint will grow well in traditional gardens, container gardens, and indoor gardens alike. Bring potted plants indoors for the winter and ensure all containers have drainage holes before potting.


 

Mint The Best Spearmint

(Mentha spicata 'Mint the Best')


Mint the Best is a type of spearmint that gets its name from its frequent and favored use in a wide variety of things from crafts to the kitchen. Mint the Best is less menthol-flavored, making it slightly more mild and ideal for use in sauces and drinks. It is also very popular dried for use in teas. This herbaceous perennial is hardy in zones 4-11 and grows well in containers. Growing mint in containers is often recommended to keep your plants from taking over. Making sure your mint plants receive 5-6 hours of sunlight will help to improve their color and flavor. Producing lilac-colored flowers in the summer, mint is often also planted for its decorative appearance. Mint is also wonderful for attracting beneficial pollinators such as bees and butterflies. It is also equally effective at repelling unwanted pests from your garden beds and flower pots.


Planting & Growing Mint The Best

  • Light: Make sure your mint plants get 5-6 hours of sunlight to help encourage the best color and flavor. Mint plants will tolerate late afternoon shade.

  • Water: Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Ensure good drainage to avoid issues with overwatering. Water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch.

  • Soil: Plant in rich and fertile soil that retains moisture but also has good drainage. Amending your soil with compost will improve drainage and moisture retention.

  • Planting: Plant mint in containers to keep it from taking over. Bring containers indoors throughout the winter and ensure containers have drainage holes before planting.


 

Oregano

(Origanum vulgare)

Oregano

This herb is a staple in the world of Italian cooking and is very popular for use in Mediterranean dishes as well. This herb has a peppery bite and minty aroma that is hard to beat. It grows well in containers and can even be used as a decorative groundcover plant or as a trailing plant in flowerpots! It grows as a perennial in zones 5-12 and is a great herb for beginners. These plants love the sun and will have a stronger flavor if grown in full sun. When grown in the garden, oregano plants can grow to be 1-2 feet tall and around 18 inches wide. Trimming them back once they reach 4 inches tall will help encourage a bushier and denser plant. Mature plants can be divided and shared with friends! Once the plant is several inches tall, you can harvest the leaves with a sharp pair of shears as needed, however, never harvest more than 1/3 of the plant at a time, as this can shock the plant and cause it to die. Oregano leaves are filled with the most flavor right before the flowers bloom in mid-summer.


Planting & Growing Oregano

  • Light: Full sun exposure is best and will encourage stronger flavor in the plant. 8+ hours of direct sun is recommended.

  • Water: Water your oregano plants when the soil feels dry to the touch. It is best to water thoroughly and less often.

  • Soil: Use a quality potting mix if growing in containers. Mix compost into your soil when growing outdoors. A well-draining soil is always recommended, and native Colorado soil may need to be amended.

  • Planting: If planting in a container, move pots indoors for the winter. When planting outside, thin out plants that are 3-4 years old to encourage healthy growth and air circulation. Oregano plants are self-seeding.


 

Hot & Spicy Oregano

(Origanum vulgare 'Hot and Spicy')

Hot & Spicy Oregano

This variety of oregano is packed full of bold flavors and has some hot and spicy flavors, as the name suggests! It is great for use in salsas, chilis, Mexican dishes, or anything that needs a little extra spice. Hot and Spicy Oregano can be used as a substitute for regular oregano, though because it is highly aromatic and pungent, it is recommended to reduce the amount used by half the suggested amount. This herbaceous perennial is hardy in zones 6-9 and features delicate pink blooms in the summer. It grows approximately 18 inches tall, featuring a nice round mounding habit. Oregano can be grown in containers.


Planting & Growing Hot and Spicy Oregano

  • Light: Oregano should be planted in full sun. It can tolerate partly shaded locations, but it will grow slower and its leaves will be less flavorful.

  • Water: Water these plants when the soil feels dry to the touch. It is best to water thoroughly and infrequently, though be careful to not let the plant dry out too much.

  • Soil: Plant in rich soil that has been amended with compost for best results. When planting in containers, use a high-quality potting mix.

  • Planting: Plant your herbs 12 inches apart to give them space to grow and maintain good air circulation. Herbs planted in containers may need to be watered more frequently. Bring container herbs indoors for the winter.


 

Crispum Dark Leaf Parsley

(Petroselinum crispum)

Crispum Dark Leaf Parsley

This variety of parsley is by far the best for flavoring. It is commonly used in Italian dishes and provides delicious flavor in soups, dressings, sauces, and pestos. Dark Leaf parsley leaves are defined by their deeply cut, flat, serrated bright green leaves. A single plant will grow to be around 12-15 inches tall. This type of parsley is hardy in zones 5-9 and is a biennial plant, meaning it has a 2-year lifecycle. In warmer climates during the second year of growth, the plant will flower and go to seed, often reseeding itself. Parsley grows easily in containers and is great for butterflies and other pollinators. If growing in containers, bring your parsley plants indoors once the weather begins to cool down for a constant supply of fresh herbs!


Planting & Growing Crispum Dark Leaf Parsley

  • Light: Crispum Dark Leaf parsley should be planted in full sun for best results.

  • Water: Water parsley thoroughly when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. Keep parsley well watered during the heat of the summer and do not let the soil dry out completely, especially with container herbs.

  • Soil: Parsley needs fertile soil that is well-draining. Use a high-quality potting mix if planting in containers. If planting in a traditional garden, amend your soil with compost before planting.

  • Planting: Grows wonderfully in a traditional in-ground garden as well as in container gardens and indoor gardens.


 

Italian Giant Parsley

(Petroselinum crispum neapolitanum)

Italian Giant Parsley

Italian Giant parsley, also known as Giant of Italy parsley, has exceptionally large and flat glossy leaves of a deep green color that are very potent and hold a sweet and fresh flavor that is the perfect addition to potatoes, vegetables, salads, soups, seafood, stews, pasta, eggs, as a garnish, and so much more. It is hardy in zones 5-9 and is a biennial plant, meaning that it will grow for two years. At the end of its second year of growth, the plant will go to seed and it is not uncommon for new plants to pop up in subsequent years due to the plant reseeding itself. Parsley grows wonderfully in a traditional garden as well as in containers. Italian Giant parsley is also a heavy producer, meaning you can have fresh herbs daily!


Planting & Growing Italian Giant Parsley

  • Light: Italian parsley prefers full sun and can tolerate partial shade.

  • Water: Water parsley regularly during the summer months and remember to check container plants as they may need to be watered daily. Never let the soil dry out completely.

  • Soil: Plant Italian parsley in rich, well-draining soil. Garden soil should be amended with compost and premium potting mix should be used when planting in containers.

  • Planting: Grows wonderfully in a traditional in-ground garden as well as in container gardens and indoor gardens. Fertilize regularly if grown in containers.


 

Barbeque Rosemary

(Rosmarinus officinalis 'Barbeque')

Barbeque Rosemary

This variety of rosemary has remarkable flavor and aroma, making it especially good for cooking! Use it as a seasoning on fish, lamb, potatoes, chicken, vegetables, and more. One of the reasons this herb gets its name is from the thick and sturdy stems of the rosemary plant. They are often sturdy enough to use as skewer sticks for barbequing your meats and vegetables! This plant is fast-growing and produces light blue flowers in the summer. It is hardy in zones 8-10 and is thus grown as an annual here in Colorado and in colder climates. BBQ rosemary can be grown in containers in colder climates so that it can be put outside during the warm season and brought indoors during the cold season. Rosemary plants are quite drought tolerant when planted in the ground as their roots have a chance to grow deep. Rosemary planted in containers are much less drought tolerant, though. In either case, rosemary is also very sensitive to overwatering and root rot. It is very important to plant rosemary in soil that drains freely and does not hold onto excess moisture.


Planting & Growing BBQ Rosemary

  • Light: Requires full sun exposure. Inadequate sunlight will result in slowed growth and a decreased harvest.

  • Water: When planted in the ground, rosemary is drought tolerant once established. Only water during periods of drought. When planted in a container, rosemary loses its drought-tolerant qualities. Never let the soil dry out completely and be sure to water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch.

  • Soil: Plant in very well-draining soil to help avoid any risk of overwatering and root rot. When planting in a container, be sure the container has a drainage hole.

  • Planting: Can be grown as an annual herb in the garden or as a container herb. Be sure to adjust how you water accordingly!


 

Officinalis Rosemary

(Rosmarinus officinalis)

Officinalis Rosemary

Rosemary is a popular herb that has a wide number of culinary uses. In addition to its usefulness, rosemary is also quite attractive in appearance. It is technically an evergreen shrub and its foliage consists of needle-like leaves that are approximately an inch long. It is highly aromatic and dons beautiful clusters of white and pale blue flowers. While rosemary is grown as a perennial plant in many areas, it is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 8-11 and is not able to survive our cold and harsh Colorado winters. For this reason, it is often grown in containers in colder climates. This allows for the plant to be grown outdoors during the warm months and then brought indoors throughout the cold winter months. Rosemary can grow up to six feet tall and five feet wide when grown in ideal circumstances, though plants grown in pots or containers will remain smaller. Rosemary is fantastic for attracting bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, as well as for repelling deer. This low-maintenance herb is great for beginners and makes a fantastic container herb for your indoor and outdoor gardens alike!


Planting & Growing Officinalis Rosemary

  • Light: Plant in full sun for best results. Rosemary will tolerate light shade but will grow best in direct sunlight.

  • Water: Rosemary is drought tolerant once established and does not require excessive watering. If planting in containers, be sure not to let the soil dry out completely. Water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is well draining. Sandy soils are ideal. Rosemary will tolerate infertile soil and should not be planted in soil that is overly fertile.

  • Planting: Rosemary is often used in flowerbeds, as groundcover plants, in hedges, in container gardens, and more. Bring potted plants indoors during the winter.


 

Tuscan Blue Rosemary

(Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Tuscan Blue’)

Tuscan Blue Rosemary

Tuscan Blue rosemary, also known as Upright Blue rosemary, grows tall and upright and produces lovely flowers of a deep blue/violet color. Their flowers attract birds, bees, and butterflies of all sorts! They are relatively easy plants to care for, making them great for beginners and professionals alike! Rosemary, while it is grown as an evergreen shrub in many areas, is only hardy to zone 8 and is not able to withstand the cold temperatures we have here in Colorado throughout the winter season. For this reason, rosemary is grown as an annual herb or is often grown in containers. At maturity, this herb can grow to be seven feet tall and two feet wide, though they stay significantly smaller when grown in containers. Pruning your rosemary bush back by as much as half in the spring is also an easy way to keep your plant from growing too large. If you chose to grow your rosemary in a container, bring it indoors for the winter. Keep it in a well-lit window and cut back on watering. Growth will slow during the winter months, but you will still have a ready supply of fresh herbs at your disposal! Use this wonderfully fragrant herb in a number of dishes including lamb, roasted meats, sausages, fish, poultry, and potatoes.


Planting & Growing Tuscan Blue Rosemary

  • Light: Grow rosemary in full sun conditions. Rosemary can tolerate light shade but may experience slowed growth.

  • Water: Once rosemary is established in the ground it becomes drought tolerant and can be watered sparingly. If planted in containers, rosemary loses its drought tolerance. Be sure to water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Allowing containers to dry out completely may harm the plant.

  • Soil: Rosemary needs light, well-drained soil. Sandy soil that has moderate-to-low organic materials is ideal. When potted in a container, make sure the pot has a drainage hole to avoid any issues with overwatering.

  • Planting: Can be grown as an annual herb in Colorado or as a container herb year around! Bring container plants indoors during the winter season.


 

Rue, Herb of Grace

(Ruta graveolens)

Rue, Herb of Grace

The rue herb is a slightly more obscure and less well-known herb, though it is quite useful in a number of different ways. Rue has many medicinal and culinary uses, and it is a great companion herb as it acts as a repellent for many creatures that you may want to keep out of your garden. While it repels unwanted guests, it attracts beneficial insects such as butterflies. It also makes for a lovely cut flower bouquet with its brightly colored yellow clusters of flowers that emerge in the summer. Rue is easy to tell apart from other herbs due to its unique foliage and blue-green coloration. It generally grows bushy and compact, reaching 2-3 feet tall at maturity. The leaves of this herb are pungent and bitter and can be used in a variety of foods and beverages including macaroni, scalloped potatoes, cheese sauces, and more! The leaves can also be dried and used as an insect repellent, amongst other uses. Rue is an herbaceous perennial and is hardy in zones 4-10, so you can count on this herb to come back year after year. Rue is very drought tolerant once it is established and needs very little water. Rue can be grown in containers, however, this limits its drought tolerance. Any herbs grown in containers should not be allowed to dry out completely and should be kept just slightly moist to avoid damage to the root system.


Planting & Growing Rue/Herb of Grace

  • Light: Rue prefers full sunlight (at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day), but can tolerate light shade. Flower production will be reduced in partly shaded growing conditions.

  • Water: Once rue is established it is very drought tolerant. It is a great plant for xeriscapes and does not need to be watered except for during periods of prolonged dry weather. Do not allow container herbs to dry out entirely and water when the top layer of soil is dry.

  • Soil: This herb requires well-draining soil that does not hold too much moisture. Rue is susceptible to root rot in soils that do not drain well. Rue prefers slightly rich soil but will tolerate poor soil.

  • Planting: Consider planting rue as a companion plant in the garden near other blooming perennials. Rue can also be planted in a container as an ornamental plant as well. Adjust watering requirements accordingly and bring container herbs indoors during the winter.


 

Garden Grey Sage

(Salvia officinalis 'Garden Grey')


This highly ornamental variety of sage features narrow leaves that are blue/grey/silver in color. Garden grey sage has a strong peppery flavor that is great for use in poultry dishes, sausage, soups, and a variety of sauces. This herb also makes for a beautiful addition to your flowerpots and gardens with its highly ornamental foliage and lovely aroma. Garden grey sage will attract pollinators, is deer resistant, can be grown in containers, and is a fast-growing herb. This herbaceous perennial is hardy in zone 4-9. When grown in traditional in-ground gardens, it can be counted on to come back year after year, is drought tolerant once established, and can grow up to 3 feet tall and around 2 feet wide. When grown in containers, however, sage becomes much more susceptible to the cold and loses its drought-tolerant properties. This is because the roots of the plant cannot grow as deep and are not insulated and protected by the ground. Bring any container herbs indoors for the winter


Planting & Growing Garden Grey Sage

  • Light: Grow sage in full sun conditions (at least 6 hours per day). This herb can tolerate slight shade, though it may experience slowed growth.

  • Water: Sage is drought tolerant once established. Allow soil to dry out between waterings. Thorough, infrequent waterings are better than frequent, shallow waterings. Container plants should not be allowed to dry out entirely and should be kept slightly moist.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, well-draining soil. Adding compost to your soil prior to planting will help[ improve drainage, increase nutrients in the soil, and help the soil maintain some moisture.

  • Planting: Garden grey sage is perennial when planted in traditional gardens. Sage grows well in containers too, though it should be brought indoors throughout the winter.


 

Golden Sage

(Salvia officinalis 'Aurea')

Golden Sage

This beautiful variety of sage features green and golden variegation which is most prominent on new grow equally as ornamental as it is useful in the kitchen, this herb is highly popular. This herb is most often used when roasting poultry, beef, lamb, pork, and other game, and is delicious in soups, stews, potatoes, and more! Golden sage is a tender herbaceous perennial that is hardy in zones 6-9, so it is often only grown as an annual here in Northern Colorado. It is not uncommon to see this herb grown in containers in areas outside of its hardiness rating as this allows for the herb to be brought indoors throughout colder periods. When planted in the ground, this herb is drought tolerant, though container planting strips the plant of this quality as containers limit the depth at which the roots can grow to access the moisture they need. Sage loves the heat, attracts birds, bees, and butterflies, is deer resistant, and is easy to grow and maintain. Most sage plants can be expected to reach 1-2 feet tall and wide, depending on where the herb is planted (in the ground or in a container).


Planting & Growing Golden Sage

  • Light: Same requires full sun conditions for optimal growth. Less than 6 hours of direct sunlight will result in diminished growth.

  • Water: Keep the soil consistently moist, but never soggy or oversaturated. Water when the top inch of soil is dry and never allow container herbs to dry out entirely.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is rich in organic materials and well-draining. Mixing compost in with your soil will increase your soils nutrient content and will also help it retain moisture and drain freely.

  • Planting: Often used as an ornamental plant, though fantastic in a number of culinary uses as well. Frost-sensitive and grown as an annual in cold climates. Bring container herbs indoors as soon as temperatures begin to cool down.


 

Pineapple Sage

(Salvia elegant)


Pineapple sage is an exquisite ornamental plant that has a number of different uses. It gets its name from the aroma of its leaves when they are crushed. This herb dons vibrant red blooms in the summer and fall and it is very effective at attracting butterflies, hummingbirds, and other beneficial pollinators. Pineapple sage is delicious in a variety of recipes, from chicken dishes and bread recipes to cakes, fruit smoothies, and more! Hardy to zones 8-10, pineapple sage is a shrubby tender perennial. In colder climates such as our own, pineapple sade will not last throughout the winter. For this reason, it is popular to grow in containers so that it can be easily brought indoors once the weather starts to cool down. This variety of salvia can grow up to five feet tall and three feet wide when grown in an in-ground garden, though its mature size is limited when grown in containers. Grow this multipurpose herb in the garden as an annual, add it to your flowerpots for some extra color and aroma, grow a garden of container herbs, and more!


Planting & Growing Pineapple Sage

  • Light: Pineapple sage will grow best in full, direct morning sun with some light afternoon shade. This will help to produce the most flavorful leaves.

  • Water: Even, consistent moisture is ideal. Soil should remain moist, but not soggy, and should never be allowed to dry out completely. Wilted, curled, or dropped leaves are a sign of underwatering.

  • Soil: Fertile, well-draining soil is ideal. Add compost to your soil before planting to improve moisture retention, drainage, and nutrient content.

  • Planting: Grow as an annual in Colorado or plant in a container garden for year-round growth. Bring container herbs indoors when the weather begins to cool down.


 

Tricolor Sage

(Salvia officinalis 'Tricolor')

Tricolor Sage

The leaves of Tricolor sage feature eye-catching variegation, making this herb not only useful in the kitchen but also a beautiful addition to any landscape or flowerpot. Use this herb to season pork, lamb, poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, stuffing, soups, marinades, and so much more! Tricolor sage can be grown as an herbaceous perennial in USDA Hardiness Zones 6-9 and is not quite as hardy as other varieties of sage. Since most temperatures in Northern Colorado are outside of this herb's preferred temperature range, it is more commonly grown as an annual or as a container herb. Planting tricolor sage in a container allows it to be brought indoors during the winter months and saved from freezing temperatures. Tricolor sage can reach around 1-2 feet tall and wide at maturity and produces little violet-colored blooms in the summer. While the mature foliage of this herb is primarily green and white, new foliage will emerge with a vibrant and rich purple color if grown in adequate sunlight.


Planting & Growing Tricolor Sage

  • Light: Grow tricolor sage in full sun conditions. Inadequate sun will decrease the purple color of new foliage.

  • Water: Keep the soil consistently moist, but never soggy, especially when planting in containers. Completely dry soil can damage the plant, though overwatering can be equally dangerous.

  • Soil: Plant in fertile, well draining soil. It is highly recommended to mix compost into your soil before planting. This will improve drainage, moisture, retention, and soil richness.

  • Planting: This variety of sage is most commonly used for ornamental purposes, though it has the same culinary purposes as other varieties of sage. It is less hardy than its relatives and is most often grown as an annual or in containers that can be brought indoors during inclement weather.


 

Stevia

(Stevia rebaudiana)

Stevia

This herb is well known for its natural sweetness. Its leaves are a wonderful sugar substitute either fresh or dried and can be used in a variety of dishes, desserts, and beverages. This tender perennial herb is hardy in zones 9 and up and is therefore only able to be grown as an annual here in Colorado. Stevia can be grown in a container and brought indoors as soon as the weather starts to cool down if you would like to grow this herb year-round. Stevia can grow up to approximately one foot tall and bears petite white flowers in the summer that have a sweet aroma. Fertilizing this plant regularly during the growing season will help to encourage healthy and bountiful leaf production. When planting in containers, it is best to plant a single herb in a 12-inch container to ensure it has adequate room to grow. This will also aid in maintaining consistent moisture in the soil throughout the growing season.


Planting & Growing Stevia

  • Light: Stevia requires full sun exposure for best growing results. Any less than 6 hours of direct sunlight per day will result in decreased production and leggy growth.

  • Water: Maintain consistently moist soil. Water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Be careful not to overwater as soggy, oversaturated soil is equally bad.

  • Soil: Plant in rich, well-draining soil. Adding compost to your soil is recommended. This will help to improve drainage, moisture retention, and nutrients. Soil pH of 6.7-7.2 is ideal, and regular fertilizing is recommended.

  • Planting: Grow as an annual or plant in containers for year-round growth. Bring container herbs indoors as soon as the weather begins to cool down. Ensure all containers have drainage holes to avoid problems with overwatering.


 

French Tarragon

(Artemisia dracunculus ‘Sativa’)

French Tarragon

This diverse herb is fantastic for use in any sort of poultry dish, as well as in sauces, dressings, aiolis, salads, and more! Often called "a chef's best friend," tarragon has a licorice-like flavor similar to that of fennel, distinguishing it from other herbs and adding depth of flavor. This herb can be grown as a perennial in zones 4-9 and can grow up to approximately three feet tall and one foot wide. French tarragon grows best in well-aerated soils and does not tolerate saturated soils. For this reason, it is best to mix compost into your soil before planting French tarragon. This will not only help create more aerated soil that will drain freely, but it will also add nutrients to the soil and help it hold onto just the right amount of moisture. French tarragon will grow equally well in the ground or in containers, you may just need to adjust your care slightly for container herbs. The flavor of French tarragon actually intensifies when grown in soils that lack nutrients. It is recommended to fertilize initially after planting and then leave it be.


Planting & Growing French Tarragon

  • Light: Prefers to be grown in full sun to partial shade. Will benefit from afternoon shade when the sun is at its hottest.

  • Water: Overwatering will cause decreased growth and lessened flavor. Water only when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Container plants should not be allowed to dry out entirely as this can cause root damage.

  • Soil: Grows best in light, well-draining, sandy soils. Rich, acidic, or moist soils are not ideal.

  • Planting: Will grow well in containers but generally only lasts for 2-3 years. Potting in a large container will give the roots more space to grow, helping your potted herbs last longer. Bring container plants indoors throughout the winter.


 

Common English Thyme

(Thymus vulgaris)

Common English Thyme

Common English thyme is known by many names such as common thyme, English thyme, garden thyme, and more. This dwarf shrub is low-growing and has a dense network of woody stems covered with petite green leaves. The leaves are very fragrant and the herb itself has numerous culinary uses as well as ornamental. It makes a beautiful groundcover plant, donning white or pink flowers in late spring and early summer and usually only growing as tall as six inches. The foliage is delicious and commonly used in soups, sauces, vegetable, meat, and fish dishes. Thyme is also wonderful for attracting bees, butterflies, and otherbeneficial pollinators. This herbaceous perennial is hardy in zones 5-9, is drought tolerant once established, is deer resistant, can be grown in containers, and is quite a low-maintenance, easy care herb ideal for beginners and seasoned gardeners alike. Keep in mind that herbs grown in containers have limited drought tolerance as the container limits the herb's ability to grow deep and strong roots. Container herbs should be brought indoors throughout the winter season to keep the roots from freezing and dying.


Planting & Growing Common English Thyme

  • Light: Thyme grows best in full sun. Inadequate light will result in the diminished growth and production of this herb.

  • Water: When planted in the ground, thyme is drought tolerant onces established. It will require more frequent waterings in its first year after planting. Container herbs should never be allowed to dry out completely. Keep the soil consistently moist and water when the top inch of soil is dry.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is loose, sandy, or rocky with great drainage.

  • Planting: Can be grown in traditional gardens or container gardens. Be sure to adjust care regimen for container gardens and bring containers indoors during the winter months.


 

Lemon Thyme

(Thymus citroidorus)


Lemon thyme, while it looks nearly identical to common thyme (English thyme), is most easily differentiated by its flavor and aroma, which very distinctly resembles that of a lemon. It can be used in any recipes that call for lemon and is highly popular for use in marinades. It is a compact, low-growing dwarf shrub with woody stems and miniature foliage. Delicate purple-colored blooms will emerge in the summer, making this herb quite ornamental. Being hardy in zones 7-9, this herbaceous perennial will provide year after year! However, in colder climates such as our own, this herb is best grown as an annual or as a container herb. Container herbs can be kept outside during the summer months and brought indoors once the weather begins to cool down. Make sure to provide any indoor containers with bright light or provide supplemental lighting for best results.


Planting & Growing Lemon Thyme

  • Light: Ensure lemon thyme plants receive full sun for best results. A decrease in aroma and flavor will occur if the lighting is less than optimal.

  • Water: Thyme prefers dry conditions and watering is only necessary when the soil is dry to the touch. Thorough, infrequent waterings are better than frequent, shallow watering. Container herbs should not be allowed to dry out entirely and should be watered when the top inch of the soil is dry.

  • Soil: Thyme adapts well to a number of different soil conditions, though it prefers to grow in loose, sandy, or rocky soil. Good drainage is key, especially when growing in containers.

  • Planting: Grow as an annual in cooler Colorado climates (perennial in zones 7-9). Makes for a fantastic container herb and can be grown indoors easily if provided with adequate light.


 

Silver Posie Thyme

(Thymus vulgaris 'Silver Posie')

Silver Posie Thyme

Silver Posie thyme is a type of common thyme that has many culinary and ornamental uses. Its aromatic leaves are a soft grey-green color with creamy white margins. Sometimes a hint of pink is present at the tips of new growth. This variety of thyme shows off with delicate clusters of flowers ranging in color from bright purple to white. These flowers are highly attractive to bees, butterflies, and other beneficial pollinators, and make a lovely addition to flower gardens and porch pots alike. Silver Posie thyme is equally useful in the kitchen, most commonly being used to season fish, poultry, lamb, and a variety of other dishes. Being hardy in zones 6-9, this herbaceous perennial will produce year after year. Since much of Northern Colorado is considered to be zones 5-6, it may be helpful to mulch your thyme plants in the winter. This will provide them with some extra insulation and will provide additional protection from cold temperatures. Silver Posie thyme also grows wonderfully in containers, making it so that you can bring your thyme indoors for the winter season and reap a harvest of herbs all year long. When planted outdoors in traditional in-ground gardens, Silver Posie thyme is drought tolerant, deer resistant, and can grow up to a foot tall and two feet wide.


Planting & Growing Silver Posie Thyme

  • Light: Plant in full sun exposure. Inadequate sun exposure will lead to decreased growth and production.

  • Water: When planted in the ground, mature plants are drought-tolerant and do not require frequent watering. Container herbs lose their drought tolerance and should never be allowed to dry out completely. Water container thyme when the top inch of soil is dry.

  • Soil: Grows best in loose, sandy, or rocky soil with excellent drainage. Make sure container herbs have a drainage hole to avoid excess moisture buildup.

  • Planting: This low-growing herb is great for use in herb gardens, flower beds, porch pots, container gardens, as a groundcover plant, and so much more. Bring container herbs indoors for the winter season. Leaving potted herbs outdoors will cause the roots to freeze and die.


 

French Thyme


French thyme, also known as summer thyme, is very similar in appearance to English thyme, however, French thyme has a slightly more subtle flavor compared to English thyme. French thyme adds fantastic flavor to any meat dish and is delicious when used in marinades, dressings, and stuffing. Similar to its relatives, French thyme is a fragrant groundcover plant that dons pink and white flowers in late spring to early summer, attracting bees and butterflies to your garden. French thyme is a perennial herb and is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9. It also grows very well in containers either indoors or outdoors. Add them to your flower pots or grow them indoors on your windowsill year-round! When planted in the garden, French thyme is drought tolerant once established but will need more frequent watering immediately after planting to help the plant establish a strong root system. Container herbs lose their drought tolerance and their soil should be kept consistently moist.


Planting & Growing Summer Thyme

  • Light: Thyme grows best in full sun. Ensure thyme is planted in an area where it will receive 6+ hours of direct sunlight per day.

  • Water: Water new plantings daily for several weeks to help establish strong roots. Once established, French thyme is somewhat drought-tolerant. Water only when the soil has had a chance to dry out. Watering thoroughly and infrequently is better than frequent but shallow waterings. Keep container herbs consistently moist and do not allow them to dry out entirely.

  • Soil: Plant in soil that is light, sandy, and well-draining. Thyme will tolerate poor soils.

  • Planting: Will grow wonderfully in the garden, in containers, and indoors. Bring any containers indoors for the winter season and provide supplemental light if needed.

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1 comentário


Kimberly Dancy
Kimberly Dancy
7 days ago

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